_DSC_4490 Tiger, Mother & Cub.jpg
_DSC_4490 Tiger, Mother & Cub.jpg

Tigers


Why save the tiger?  Besides the tiger's incredible beauty, as an apex predator, the tiger is a fairly good barometer of the health of the entire ecosystem.  If the forest vegetation isn't healthy, grazing mammals won't be healthy, and they won't be good food for this premier big cat.  We are all -- human and animal -- connected in ways we are just beginning to understand.  In fact, nations that neglect their natural environment are at risk for increased frequency and magnitude of natural disasters -- floods, droughts, landslides, earthquakes, and more.  The tiger is worthy of preservation in and of his own right, but in addition, he is an excellent spokesman for the environment as a whole.

There are two basic approaches -- direct intervention and protecting the environment so the tiger can flourish on his own.  India, through Project Tiger, has taken the second approach.  

It's worked well.  In 1973, when 9 nature reserves (including Kanha) were established, India had 1,800 tigers.  Now, it has almost 4,000. 

So what does the tiger need now?  Two things will help today's tiger:  prevent poaching, and take human stress off the tiger's environment.  We contribute to these ends through economic development, use of eco-technologies, and awareness for policymakers and everyone with our whitepaper series, newspaper articles, and books (available on Amazon):

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Tigers


Why save the tiger?  Besides the tiger's incredible beauty, as an apex predator, the tiger is a fairly good barometer of the health of the entire ecosystem.  If the forest vegetation isn't healthy, grazing mammals won't be healthy, and they won't be good food for this premier big cat.  We are all -- human and animal -- connected in ways we are just beginning to understand.  In fact, nations that neglect their natural environment are at risk for increased frequency and magnitude of natural disasters -- floods, droughts, landslides, earthquakes, and more.  The tiger is worthy of preservation in and of his own right, but in addition, he is an excellent spokesman for the environment as a whole.

There are two basic approaches -- direct intervention and protecting the environment so the tiger can flourish on his own.  India, through Project Tiger, has taken the second approach.  

It's worked well.  In 1973, when 9 nature reserves (including Kanha) were established, India had 1,800 tigers.  Now, it has almost 4,000. 

So what does the tiger need now?  Two things will help today's tiger:  prevent poaching, and take human stress off the tiger's environment.  We contribute to these ends through economic development, use of eco-technologies, and awareness for policymakers and everyone with our whitepaper series, newspaper articles, and books (available on Amazon):

Tigers in the Living Forest: Wildlife of Kanha, India

Tigers in the Living Forest: Wildlife of Kanha, India

A Week in Kanha: Tigers & Others in India

A Week in Kanha: Tigers & Others in India

Sharks in the Living Seas: Wildlife of Our World's Oceans

Sharks in the Living Seas: Wildlife of Our World's Oceans

Fast Fact:

"Traders pay poachers 2,000 rupees (US$56) for a dead tiger. 

That's almost half of what a typical farmer makes in a year. 

The traders can then sell the tiger skin for 50,000 to 80,000 rupees

(US$1,390 to US$2,220), and the bones for up to 120,000 rupees (US$3,330). 

Such tiger poaching is one of the gravest threats facing wild tigers today....

Nowadays, it's estimated that one tiger is poached in India every day."  

(www.mnzoo.com/education/ticadventures/ta4text/a3.htm)